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pleatedjeans:

lead paint comics

This is absolutely the secret.  Your happiness lies in your ability to be 100 % invested in Step 2.

pleatedjeans:

lead paint comics

This is absolutely the secret.  Your happiness lies in your ability to be 100 % invested in Step 2.

(via allisontype)

Video

paulftompkins:

Hey, this pilot created by and starring Maria Bamford and James Urbaniak has been hiding on the internet since 2011! But no pilots in which I guest can hide for very long! I am like the Javert of pilots I am in! - Paul

"MARIA, ME AND A MONSTER"

Maria Bamford and James Urbaniak star in a sitcom pilot written by Maria and James, and directed/edited by David Avallone. Guest-starring Paul F. Tompkins, Rhea Seehorn and Janie Haddad

Paul F. kindly blogged this pilot we worked on together. It’s a crazy little thing, and one of my favorite projects.

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This is the one I want to see.  (Everyone’s already done this one, right?  Sorry.)

This is the one I want to see. 

(Everyone’s already done this one, right?  Sorry.)

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A quick note on images and memory and cultural signifers.Last night, my wife’s show UNMENTIONABLES featured an amazing act by Greta Grenade, which was a tribute to The Unbearable Lightness of Being.  Fans of that book or movie will recognize the bowler hat, as worn by Sabina/Lena Olin.I took this picture with my bowler on, in tribute to Greta’s number, and posted it on Facebook.Comments on the photo mostly mentioned two cultural touchstones.  John Steed from The Avengers.  Alex the Droog from A Clockwork Orange.What struck me is that no one said “you look like a boring British businessman.”  Both Steed and the Droogs wear the bowler satirically, an ironic placement of the most dull and conservative piece of clothing on a dashing secret agent and a psychotic criminal.  In The Unbearable Lightness of Being, the juxtaposition is likewise ironic and provocative.The reactions fascinated me because the satire is sharply remembered while the object of satire fades in cultural memory.Just a passing thought.

A quick note on images and memory and cultural signifers.

Last night, my wife’s show UNMENTIONABLES featured an amazing act by Greta Grenade, which was a tribute to The Unbearable Lightness of Being.  Fans of that book or movie will recognize the bowler hat, as worn by Sabina/Lena Olin.

I took this picture with my bowler on, in tribute to Greta’s number, and posted it on Facebook.

Comments on the photo mostly mentioned two cultural touchstones.  John Steed from The Avengers.  Alex the Droog from A Clockwork Orange.

What struck me is that no one said “you look like a boring British businessman.”  Both Steed and the Droogs wear the bowler satirically, an ironic placement of the most dull and conservative piece of clothing on a dashing secret agent and a psychotic criminal.  In The Unbearable Lightness of Being, the juxtaposition is likewise ironic and provocative.

The reactions fascinated me because the satire is sharply remembered while the object of satire fades in cultural memory.

Just a passing thought.

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Sad to hear that Maximilian Schell died today.If we’d ever met, the photo above would have been the first topic of conversation.  The second would have been Hamlet.My father wrote the novelization of KRAKATOA, EAST OF JAVA, seen above.  After oing a little research, dad called the producers and said, “Hey, guys… Krakatoa seems to be West of Java…”  No one listens. But it might have been nice to have a laugh with Max about it. He goes through the movie with a grim set to his jaw and seems to be thinking, “English is my second language… this dialogue CAN’T be as awful as it sounds.  Can it?”Aside: one thing that no one remembers about the movie is that it is also a musical.  Yes.  A musical.  Lovely music, really, and songs, by Frank DeVol.  When you see it now, on TV or DVD, if at all, generally they’ve cut the songs out.  Because… what?  I think in 1969 the idea was “It’s THE SOUND OF MUSIC… with lava!”  The second thing I would have liked to talk to Schell about is Hamlet.A few years back, BRAVO (before it became the minstrel show it is today) played a great special about Hamlet. It showed clips of every Hamlet ever filmed, in a variety of languages.  All the familiar faces and fine performances were there.  But the knockout was Maximilian Schell.  In German. I don’t speak German (despite two tiresome years of it in Junior High), but even subtitled… Schell was the greatest Hamlet I’ve ever seen.  He was mesmerizing and funny and sharp and emotional and controlled.  He was also, not for nothing, ridiculously handsome, which works well for the part. It was only two scenes, but I’ve never forgotten it. I wonder if it’s on youtube…Good night, sweet prince, and all that.

Sad to hear that Maximilian Schell died today.

If we’d ever met, the photo above would have been the first topic of conversation.  The second would have been Hamlet.

My father wrote the novelization of KRAKATOA, EAST OF JAVA, seen above.  After oing a little research, dad called the producers and said, “Hey, guys… Krakatoa seems to be West of Java…”  

No one listens. But it might have been nice to have a laugh with Max about it. He goes through the movie with a grim set to his jaw and seems to be thinking, “English is my second language… this dialogue CAN’T be as awful as it sounds.  Can it?”

Aside: one thing that no one remembers about the movie is that it is also a musical.  Yes.  A musical.  Lovely music, really, and songs, by Frank DeVol.  When you see it now, on TV or DVD, if at all, generally they’ve cut the songs out.  Because… what?  I think in 1969 the idea was “It’s THE SOUND OF MUSIC… with lava!”  

The second thing I would have liked to talk to Schell about is Hamlet.

A few years back, BRAVO (before it became the minstrel show it is today) played a great special about Hamlet. It showed clips of every Hamlet ever filmed, in a variety of languages.  All the familiar faces and fine performances were there.  But the knockout was Maximilian Schell.  In German. I don’t speak German (despite two tiresome years of it in Junior High), but even subtitled… Schell was the greatest Hamlet I’ve ever seen.  He was mesmerizing and funny and sharp and emotional and controlled.  He was also, not for nothing, ridiculously handsome, which works well for the part. It was only two scenes, but I’ve never forgotten it. I wonder if it’s on youtube…

Good night, sweet prince, and all that.


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Success, or the Called Bluff

Forgive the navel-gazing ramble…  this question is basic to anybody who works in the popular arts.

Do you want to be rich and famous, or do you want to do the work?

At the beginning of your career, many (myself included) answer this question the same way: obviously I’m in it for the work.  I love making films whether it makes me rich and famous or not. “I’d be happy if they let me ______” fill in the blank with the humiliating entertainment industry job of your choice.

But then one day you wake up and you’re not in your twenties anymore, or not in your thirties anymore, and this starry-eyed bluff gets called. 

Did you mean it?  Did I mean it?

I still get asked the question “what is your dream job?  What do you wish you were doing?” As you might imagine, it’s not great to be asked “what do you want to do when you grow up?” when you’re almost fifty.

And my answer, for years, has been “I have my dream job. My only wish is to get paid more for doing it.”

I am a freelance filmmaker who works in a variety of areas of production and post production. I wake up every morning and make movies, one way or another. Usually without what anyone could call a “boss”. Better still, I generally get to choose who I work with, and most often work with good friends and colleagues I respect.

The downside: as I work mostly on independent projects, none of this pays particularly well.

So… what is success?  In 2013 I produced and edited a feature film.  I directed a web series. I co-directed a couple of music videos. I shot a bunch of videos for a political media company, including an ad campaign that got a man elected to Mayor of Detroit. I sang and did some comedy in my wife’s burlesque variety show. I got elected to the Board of Directors of a charity organization that means a lot to me (A IS FOR.)  I managed the roll-out of my father’s books on Amazon.com. Standing back, that sounds like a pretty good year.

On the other end of the scale: sometimes I paid the rent late, and sometimes I had to do math when I went grocery shopping.  At forty-eight, that gets really, really, literally “old”.

And yet… “Success”, as a concept, doesn’t trouble me much.  Should it?  The bluff is called, and as long as the work keeps coming in, I’m satisfied.

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We hold these truths to be self evident.

geekishchic:

mcisaacs:

recent studies reveal that 100% of abortions are performed on people who do not wish to be pregnant and 0% of abortions are performed on conservative republican men

*reblogs so fast it almost breaks computer*

(via allisontype)

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KENTISM: New Deal DayThe difference between Superman and Clark Kent is window dressing. Clark Kent is transparently good and kind, and — according to no less a judge than Perry White — a talented writer and reporter, and a valuable member of the community. A basic tenet of Kentism is not just to embody Superman, his values and his good works, but to see Superman in those around you.Today is an important Kentist Holiday: New Deal Day. Today we celebrate the Kents’ well-intentioned defrauding of the Federal Government, and obtaining a Social Security number and card for illegal immigrant baby Kal-El. Today we celebrate the important, All-American values of Immigration, Reinvention, and Rebirth. Happy New Deal, everybody!

KENTISM: New Deal Day

The difference between Superman and Clark Kent is window dressing. Clark Kent is transparently good and kind, and — according to no less a judge than Perry White — a talented writer and reporter, and a valuable member of the community. A basic tenet of Kentism is not just to embody Superman, his values and his good works, but to see Superman in those around you.

Today is an important Kentist Holiday: New Deal Day. Today we celebrate the Kents’ well-intentioned defrauding of the Federal Government, and obtaining a Social Security number and card for illegal immigrant baby Kal-El. Today we celebrate the important, All-American values of Immigration, Reinvention, and Rebirth. Happy New Deal, everybody!

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allisontype:

xojanedotcom:

If you get confused this holiday season… [Infographic by Kristin Myers]

Always reblog.

My very first reblog, but I think it’s important.Also, where can one find these toys?

allisontype:

xojanedotcom:

If you get confused this holiday season… 
[Infographic by Kristin Myers]

Always reblog.

My very first reblog, but I think it’s important.

Also, where can one find these toys?

Link

Trolls are actually making the entire world less intelligent, dragging us down with them.  Just say no.  Here’s the relevant quote about context:

"A politically motivated, decades-long war on expertise has eroded the popular consensus on a wide variety of scientifically validated topics. Everything, from evolution to the origins of climate change, is mistakenly up for grabs again. Scientific certainty is just another thing for two people to “debate” on television. And because comments sections tend to be a grotesque reflection of the media culture surrounding them, the cynical work of undermining bedrock scientific doctrine is now being done beneath our own stories, within a website devoted to championing science.”